Washington Post says The Perfect Workout’s “Slow-motion strength training is hard — and fast.”

We would like to thank the Washington Post for choosing to feature us in an amazing article that helps spread the message about Slow Motion Strength Training and the amazing results associated with this scientifically proven method.

Here are the points from the article:

  • These training studios offer clients more of a personal training in a quiet, no-frills space filled with Nautilus equipment 
  • It’s a complete workout in just two short sessions per week.



Here’s the drill: 
  • A high-intensity, low-impact program known as “slow-motion strength training”
  • Gradually lifting and releasing weights without the aid of rest or momentum brings muscles to exhaustion also known as “muscle success”.
  • It is extremely difficult but it’s also only a total of 20 minutes per session.
  • Though The Perfect Workout, a California-based outfit founded in 1999, is new to the East Coast, the Slow-motion strength training concept isn’t.
  • The Perfect Workout system cites principles outlined just over 30 years ago by fitness professional Ken Hutchins. 
  • In slowing down movements to safely train women with osteoporosis, Hutchins concluded that the technique builds muscle more effectively than conventional weight training.
  • The effectiveness of slow-motion strength training depends on the individual, according to Lee Jordan, a spokesman for the American Council on Exercise, but it offers a broad range of people a safe and viable program.
  • Like high-intensity interval training, Jordan says, it seeks to remove the top barrier to exercise: time. 
  • Unlike high-intensity interval training (“by its very nature, it’s extreme,” Jordan says), slow-motion strength training is accessible to anyone.
  • Practitioners of slow-motion strength training also satisfy their need for cardiovascular activity.
  • The key to an exercise routine is sticking to that routine. And The Perfect Workout’s clients say this program works.
  • Clients love to hate slow-motion strength training but they keep coming back because they get results.
  • Slow-motion strength training practitioners often report better body composition plus lower blood sugar and cholesterol.
  • Slow-motion strength training may not be sexiest or most trendiest, but it gets the job done quicker and safer.
  • Many clients of an advanced age love the safety along with the added bone strength that slow-motion strength training offers.
  • Slow-motion training sessions come in several convenient packages. Some packages even help reduce osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes. 



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